Laboratory:  How To Make An Elevator Song In The Style Of Miley Cyrus
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Laboratory: How To Make An Elevator Song In The Style Of Miley Cyrus




Any music geek worth their salt knows of the unfettered pleasure to be had in experiencing elevator music. Lift songs are always simultaneously kitschy, kind of adorable, fatally catchy, and curiously entrancing. Extra fun is had, too, when lifts are stocked with fresh covers of well-known pop songs. What seems to be seasonal rotation of said songs mandates, then, that an 'elevator rendition' of Miley Cyrus' 'Wrecking Ball' exists and is driving suits crazy somewhere in the world. If not, we'll show you how to make one:

WHAT YOU'LL NEED

- Digital recording software. Ableton, Pro Tools, Logic all work great.

- Some drum samples. You won't need many, and a lot of great ones come with store-bought recording programs.

WE'LL BE USING ABLETON

STEP 1. BOSSA NOVA, BABY!


Bossa nova percussion rhythms are inherently calming, and that's why you'll always hear a bossa beat in a lift song. We've used a 'Latin' percussion rack on Ableton, but note: You want some cabasa twistin', a few short guiro hits, and ONLY rim-shots as snare hits. Go nuts with shakers, though. Can't have too many.

STEP 2. WURLITZER


A warbly Wurlitzer is the second-most vital ingredient in fashioning a killer elevator pop-cover. Ableton comes with some great E-piano plug-ins, and any will do. We've used the keys as accompaniment; for the D minor to F Major to C Major to G minor chord progression. The progression's rhythmic accents should follow the rim-hits, FIY.

STEP 3. MARIMBA


You cannot have an elevatorized 'Wrecking Ball' without some unnecessary and almost inaudible marimba pattering. We've used Ableton's 'Bright Marimba' preset, which follows our Wurlitzer chord progression in a more minimal, foundational way.

STEP 4. CHEESY OCARINA MELODY


Elevatorized melodies must always be handled by the most annoying, shrill woodwind instruments imaginable. We've used a shitty MIDI ocarina preset to emulate Miley's voice, and this case, the substitution seems quite apropos.

Once you've assembled all of the above parts, be sure to loop the completed product specifically before melodic climaxes are reached. To illustrate, we've omitted the chorus. Hypothetically by the time it would roll around, we'd hope everyone would've vacated the lift anyway.
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