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Kill TV - Vulture Culture




At 25 + minutes, this short album by the band Kill TV is a mixed bag.

  

Hailing from Brisbane Australia, a place not especially to known for its indie rock, rather glitz, club DJs and what have you, so its interesting to see some rock activism come out of Brisbane. However, with the socialist moniker ‘stand up and be counted – sit down and be consumed' – it remained to be seen how significant a political statement this disc was to be. But hell, so much of the time it is another excuse to rock, isn't it?

  

‘War Machine' is a rifftastic bunch of fret melting punk grind core goodness, with interesting riffs and vocal lines. Very reminiscent of bands like Bodyjar, amongst others. Considering the formula of these genres, they cut up the song dynamic in interesting ways. Perpetual Rote is a continuance of the style of riffing.

  

‘Chomsky Files': Then Kill TV gets pomo-rocking on our arses with a song dedicated to the post-structural linguist and renowned anarchist thinker Chomsky. I'm sure ol' Noam himself would bop his head in earnest hearing his thought being expounded to the throng of Australian youth buying this cd. Still, the quirkiness is a little lost considering this type of punk has been exemplified by a few out there in our great punk rock nether sphere. ‘For the Country' embraces a bit of a patriotic song theme. ‘Zeppelin Gesture' slows the pace a little with some wah riffing and melodic singing, as opposed to the whooping and snarling, and ‘My Hero' slowing the pace with a heartfelt vocal delivery and textual guitar balladeering. This cd is like CPR on a crash test humanoid - It promises everything but doesn't quite flag to life like it ought to.

  

The compositions on the whole are modest – let's see how Kill TV evolve with their recordings, they are liable to rip it up on stage in the interim. Production wise, this album is a winner, and the graphics damned good too – but listen out for the radio mix on the airwaves at about this time!

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